FontShop Newsletter: October 3, 2012
In this issue
   
Typographic Trends: Handmade
Webfonts on FontShop: New additions
New foundry: Latinotype
New foundry: Typesenses
New foundry: Indian Type Foundry
More new fonts: Rollerscript Family, Edward, HaruNami, Henriette
New feature on FontShop: Filter by language
 
 
Typographic Trends: Handmade
 
 
 

Trends in typographic design influence the way we approach our work, the constraints placed upon our compositions, and ultimately the way our work looks, feels, and functions.

In our ongoing series on Typographic Trends, Type Expert David Sudweeks reveals what he sees as some of the prominent trends emerging in visual culture, with analysis on the themes and undercurrents that propel the movements. Here’s a taste.

Madelinette
 
 
 

Madelinette by Tart Workshop

Trends come from something. They don’t emerge out of nothingness on their merits alone, but each requires a background from which it may come to the fore. It’s because trends come in response to something else that their principles resonate and grow in popularity. One example is the present response to the highly finished corporate brand image — or in fact anything that appears too easily reproduced — in favor of a more substantial, personable connection to one’s professional services, goods, etc. Humanist details aid in building a relationship between people and the things we designers make for them, a bit of playful script lettering for example, or a casually worded tooltip that gently offers assistance.

FF Duper
 
 
 

FF Duper by FontFont

One way of introducing just the right level of ease to a piece or campaign is through the careful use of lettering or hand-drawn type. The presence of the human hand in a composition lends a sense of relatability, and perhaps with it, humility. The wave of hand-made type that now arrives in response to the demand of art directors and designers shows that the trend's guiding principles continue to resonate.

Strangelove
 
 
 
Webfonts on FontShop: New additions
 
Webfonts on FontShop
 

 

More and more of the faces we carry are now also available as webfonts. With each release, foundries like ReType, Gestalten, URW and more introduce work prepared specifically for rendering on the Web. Browse our webfonts page by foundry, or simply add the word Web to your search to find the webfonts you need.

 
 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
 
Webfonts on FontShop
 

Of course our house brand, FontFont, continues to add to its library of webfonts with each update. Web FontFonts are unique because they can be tested live in any browser with FontFonter, compressed with Subsetter, and easily transferred to Typekit at checkout if you prefer separate font hosting.

New foundry: Latinotype
 
Latinotype
 

As the name implies, Latinotype is a new digital type foundry from Latin America. It was established in 2007 in Concepción, Chile, by type designers Daniel Hernández and Miguel Hernández, who’ve each released fonts through Sudtipos, and Luciano Vergara. Their goal is to create new typefaces incorporating and remixing diverse influences from their Latino identity, producing high quality fonts for contemporary designers.

 
 
 
Andes Condensed
 

Andes Condensed

Designed by Daniel Hernández
Published by Latinotype

 

Andes is a display sans serif with neo-humanist characteristics, based on the delicate, curly Merced. Curved terminals, bulging features and a couple of script-like alternate glyphs lend it a friendly appearance. Its narrow forms make Andes Condensed the perfect space-saving solution for personable headlines and short- to medium-length copy in advertising, editorial design, branding, etc.

 
 
 
Ride My Bike
 

Ride My Bike

Designed by Guisela Mendoza
Published by Latinotype

 

Ride My Bike is a fresh, hand-lettered typeface, a hybrid between casual sans serif and upright script inspired by street style and bicycle culture. It is a surprising, fun alternative for display use in branding and fashion photography. The Pro version contains over 600 glyphs, including initial and final forms, ligatures and alternates, as well as a suite of 91 amusing dingbats.

New foundry: Typesenses
 
Typesenses
 

Sabrina Mariela Lopez — a calligrapher, type designer and graphic designer from Buenos Aires, Argentina — founded Typesenses in 2009. She does not regard being left-handed as an impediment, but as a challenge. After graduating Sabrina traveled to Boston to be taught by renowned calligraphers such as Julian Waters, Georgia Deaver, Carl Rohrs, Betina Naab and Maria Eugenia Roballos. Through experimental calligraphy she tries to create expressive forms and strokes that she never could create digitally. “The perfect technology is our bodies,” she says, “while the computer is just a tool.”

 
 
 
Parfumerie Script
 

Parfumerie Script

Designed by Sabrina M Lopez
Published by Typesenses

 

Sabrina has worked on this formal calligraphic script exclusively and obsessively for two years. With more than 2500 glyphs, Parfumerie is based on the author’s actual calligraphy. Attractive like a fragrance, the design is delicate, elegant, sophisticated, feminine, sensual, and glamorous. One of its many OpenType features is a Decorative option, combining copperplate calligraphy with an ornamental form native to Buenos Aires, the “Filete Portenio”.

New foundry: Indian Type Foundry
 
Indian Type Foundry
 

The Indian Type Foundry (ITF) was established in 2009 by Satya Rajpurohit and Peter Biľak to create and market fine quality typefaces for the Indian market and the global world. ITF specializes in developing retail and custom Unicode-compliant digital fonts for both Indian and Latin scripts.

 
 
 
Tulika Bengali
   

This text face, inspired by traditional Bengali calligraphy, features distinctive, sinuous shapes and a pronounced contrast between thick and thin strokes. Its perfect legibility, even in adverse situations, makes Tulika the perfect choice for use in editorial design and publishing.

 
 
 
ITF Devanagari
   

This is a classically proportioned, high-contrast typeface for text in Devanagari, the script that Sanskrit, Hindi, and other languages of India are written in. It’s suitable for setting books and magazines, and it works with the strict demands of newspaper printing. The family consists of five weights and is optimized for superb legibility, even in small text sizes.

More new fonts: Rollerscript Family, Edward, HaruNami, Henriette
 

Rollerscript Family

Designed by Nick Cooke
Published by G-Type

Nick Cooke’s new handwriting face masterfully strikes a balance between too little structure and too much, coming off looking legitimately handwritten, casually, in spurts. As you type, Rollerscript’s many alternate forms and ligatures pop into action, changing and swapping out characters to ensure that identical glyphs don’t appear too near one another on a line. This makes for a consistent personality and a good overall fit. Rollerscript comes in two variants: Rough, and the more simplified Smooth.

 
Rollerscript Family
 
 
 
 

Edward

Designed by Hendrik Weber
Published by OurType

Edward Johnston’s “blockletter” alphabet, popularized by its use in the London Underground and made oddly familiar through Eric Gill’s similar Gill Sans, is one of the earliest versions of the humanist sans. Hendrik Weber’s revival of Johnston’s work comes with an extensive character set and thoughtful touches. We especially like the case-specific punctuation and the additional four sets of figures for use with small caps.

 
Edward
 
 
 
 

HaruNami

Designed by Chiharu Tanaka
Published by PsyOps Type Foundry

In HaruNami, San Francisco type designer Chiharu Tanaka brings together the staid presence of the American Gothic with the dynamic movement of traditional Japanese wave art. Her forms grow more intricate as they progress through four versions: Simple, Decorative, Embellished, and Ornate. While the simplified lowercase functions well at text sizes, its ornamented caps gain full effect at display sizes.

 
HaruNami
 
 
 
 

Henriette

Designed by Michael Hochleitner
Published by Typejockeys

Among the advancements of 1920s Vienna was the stardardization of its street and park signage. Distinctively bold faces enameled in white on blue still decorate the city’s streets. Michael Hochleiter’s Henriette recreates the feeling of these sign faces in five weights and across three widths, each with companion italics. Should Henriette be called to work as a signage face, its bonus frames font allows the typographer to compose matching borders.

 
Henriette
New feature on FontShop: Filter by language
   

With our latest language filter update, you can now search more powerfully on FontShop.com. Need a serif family that supports both English and Arabic? From the Category page, click Serif, add those two languages, click Update Filter, voila. Language filtering is available on any sub-category page, as well as our Bestsellers page. Language filters are presently in beta. Your feedback is most welcome.

 
See more new fonts at FontShop.com
 
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