FontShop Newsletter: October 17, 2012
In this issue
   
New foundry: VetteLetters
New Sudtipos font: Hipster Script
New TypeTogether fonts: Adelle Sans, Sirba Greek
New Emtype font: Ciutadella
Typographic Trends: Hipster Type & Lettering
TYPO London: This weekend
Coming soon: Typographic tricks and treats
 
 
New foundry: VetteLetters
 
VetteLetters
 

If other type foundries are like haute cuisine restaurants, Amsterdam-based VetteLetters is the font snack bar. “Vette letters” means “greasy/fat letters”, and this foundry has been proclaiming its love for food and fonts since Donald® Roos first cooked up the business in 2007. After a wonderful career as a dishwasher, assistant cook, some kind of designer, then a type designer, Donald® is now co-CEO of VetteLetters. Donald DBXL Beekman, known around the office as “the other Donald”, is also co-CEO and produces as many typefaces as Prince makes records. Jacques “Sardines” Le Bailly, also known as the Baron von Fonthausen, Chief Type Tech. Dev. Dept., and Martin “TwoPoints” Lorenz bakes his fonts in the warmer climate of Barcelona.

 
 
 
 

VLNL Brak

Designed by Donald Beekman
Published by VetteLetters

Brak is a surprising all-caps display face constructed solely out of straight lines. It combines sharp corners with round stroke endings. All the letters come in two versions for more variation and flexibility. The design updates influences from Art Deco and De Nieuwe Stijl, transporting them to the contemporary world of clubbing and political activism. The perfect typographic solution for your Occupy Afterparty posters.

 
VLNL Brak
 
 
 
 

VLNL Neue Sardines

Designed by Jacques Le Bailly
Published by VetteLetters

Sardines was originally a student project by Jacques Le Bailly, a monospaced font. Neue Sardines is an impressive type family of 42 monospaced fonts in 11 normal and 10 condensed weights, all in smooth and rough finish. The unicase design’s mix of lowercase and uppercase letters is more than dynamic; it’s practically a carnival. While most VetteLetters typefaces are market-fresh, this one comes out of a can, but it’s delicious nonetheless.

 
VLNL Neue Sardines
 
 
 
 

VLNL Spaghetti Bolognese

Designed by Donald Roos
Published by VetteLetters

Drawn in college in 1999 by Donald® Roos in an effort to create the “most beautiful” alphabet in the world, Spaghetti remained untouched for many years, all but forgotten. More than a decade later it was finally revived in glorious OpenType. The unusual script marries high-contrast, italic shapes with curvy connectors. Subtly bulging terminals automatically begin and end each word, and a tasty suite of ligatures adds typographic sophistication.

 
VLNL Spaghetti Bolognese
 
New Sudtipos font: Hipster Script
Hipster Script
 

Hipster Script

Designed by Alejandro Paul
Published by Sudtipos

 

With Hipster Script, Argentinian script master Alejandro Paul attempts once again to bridge the manual and the digital. He borrows the spontaneity of post-war ad lettering and the contemporary trend of emulated brushstrokes. The design is similar to that of his Feel Script, a digital interpretation of glamorously free-flowing script based on the dramatic copperplate shapes of yesteryear’s commercial lettering. Hipster’s stroke contrast is more casual than Feel Script’s though, and its swashes, alternates, and ligatures capture the subtle interplay between stroke widths in hand-painted letters.

New TypeTogether fonts: Adelle Sans, Sirba Greek
Adelle Sans
   

This sans-serif counterpart to the award-winning Adelle type family offers a cleaner, more spirited take on the traditional grotesque sans. As usual with TypeTogether fonts, designers took the most demanding editorial design pieces into consideration when they engineering Adelle Sans. Its lively character and its unobtrusive appearance, inherent to grotesque sans serifs, make it a versatile tool, fit for any imaginable graphic application, whether it is branding, signage or advertising. Without any doubt, the key word behind Adelle Sans’ design is flexibility.

 
 
 
Sirba
   

This low-contrast serif type family with a friendly personality has a contemporary appearance and a classic touch. It was conceived to answer the demands of complex text environments like dictionaries, academic texts, annual reports, novels and magazines. Intensive study of typefaces used in bibles and dictionaries in the era of letterpress printing resulted in a pleasant reading experience and perfect legibility, even in small sizes. Sirba’s character set covers over 50 languages that use the Latin script plus polytonic Greek and a full set of IPA symbols.

New Emtype font: Ciutadella
Ciutadella
 

Ciutadella

Designed by Eduardo Manso
Published by Emtype

 

Ciutadella was originally commissioned by Mario Eskenazi’s studio in Barcelona. Its clean, straightforward, geometric simplicity and “open” personality, reminiscent of the DIN-model, make for a straightforward, versatile typeface. Ciutadella is a match for any occasion where you want to assert your pragmatism, from identity systems to publication design. Although it was originally conceived as a display face, it performs well in medium-length copy thanks to specific features like an alternate two-story ‘a’.

Typographic Trends: Hipster Type & Lettering
 
 
 

Hipster design seeks to predate itself, reintroducing elements from simpler times and arranging them into marks and compositions that have a certain matter-of-fact-ness about them.

To hipster-fy a brand, apply design elements generally, or, even better, inconsistently. Be pithy, and set page elements at intersecting right angles around a central mark. Here’s an example of the kind of work that signifies the hipster design movement.

Hipster Type & Lettering
 
 
 

Photo by David Sudweeks

This well restored sign hangs on Howard Street in San Francisco. It’s clear. Hand-rendered in a strong, all-caps sans serif alphabet (to borrow a sign painter’s term) with complementing commercial script, the piece has generous margins and a defined visual hierarchy. The letterforms’ proportions and spacing aren’t perfect, but the sign’s imperfection is one of its greatest assets. What I see in the larger hipster design and branding movement is a call to appreciate the flexibility and inconsistency of our graphic-design past.

When in 1952 The Dahl-Beck Electric Company folks needed a sign for their new location, they didn’t approach a graphic design firm. They went to a sign shop. When they needed letterhead or business cards printed, they went to a printer. Did the marks match? No. Was that a problem? Good question. Practitioners of hipster design would argue no. When a company’s design consistency is a lesser priority, that means other things take higher priority, like showing up to the job site on time, performing reliable service, creating a great product, etc. There was likely little discussion of “visual concept” with any of these pieces. The execution was the concept.

   

So, in an attempt to appear established, perhaps winking at the irony created by the freshness of their look, small businesses today sign off on the work of graphic designers whose aim is to present them as having existed before design as we know it.

TYPO London: This weekend
 
   

Come be Social in the UK this weekend with incredible speakers like Paula Scher, Simon Manchipp, Joshua Davis and Irma Boom. Join design industry leaders, professionals and students for TYPO London Social. The event will again take place at Logan Hall at the University of London’s Institute of Education Oct. 19-20. Full schedule, livestream schedule, and advance registration at typotalks.com/london. Get your tickets today!

Coming soon: Typographic tricks and treats
 
 

Prepare yourself now for typographic tricks and treats coming to your inbox on October 31. In the meantime, check our selection of frightening fonts, scary scripts and traumatizing typefaces to spruce up your own Halloween graphics!

Halloween type on The FontFeed »

 
 
See more new fonts at FontShop.com
 
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