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Fonts in Action

May 04, 2022

Welcome to this year's Fonts in Action sale! Creatives and type-enthusiasts are always utilizing fonts in many different ways, from advertising, fashion and apparel, packaging, branding, and many others. Because of this we have carefully curated OVER 120 fonts and we’re highlighting them all week in their best use cases. Fonts in Action Sale of up to 65% off ends May 25th at 11:59 p.m. EDT! Don’t miss out, grab these deals today!

These fonts are not all our own. This is work by other brands, agencies, and foundries that we admire and whose work really stood out over the last twelce and some odd months. Each font shown here represents one of the 10 categories that were a part of the Monotype Type Trends Reporst by Charles Nix and Phil Garnham. We are proud to present these trends and see the amazing designs that come from them being used. Be a type trendsetter and purchase one of the fonts below!



ADVERTISING: It doesn’t matter if the advertising you’re creating is for print, interactive, email or social media, the first rule of advertising typography is “stick to your brand.” Advertising is about being noticed and sending a quick message to sell a product. Advertisements are not lingered-on or studied. Bold typefaces are the best choices; bold typefaces that are legible and deliver their message at a glance. The eye can grasp about three or four words at a time, so headlines should be short and to the point.

If, however, your client’s primary branding typeface is a neutral design like Helvetica® Now or Macklin™, and if there isn’t already a companion branding typeface, you might want to suggest the addition of a second family to the mix that has a more vibrant persona. Just be sure that the new design pairs well with the primary typeface – and that it doesn’t have too much personality. Typefaces that are highly distinctive generally don’t age well. Browse through our selection for inspiration from what our foundry partners are doing within advertising.



BRANDING: Type is one of the most important aspects of any branding solution. Type can easily differentiate a company from its competition – and every company has competition.

When choosing typefaces for brand design, think big. Look to families with several weights, variations and proportions. You may only need a handful of fonts, at first, but rest-assured situations will arise that call for additional weights, condensed and even expanded designs.

Don’t try to use a font to replicate a logo. Logos are almost always hand-drawn. The initial type selection for a client should hinge off the characteristics of the logotype. It’s part of the client's unique DNA.

Brands are supposed to last a long time. Pick a typeface that will not look out of date in two or three years. Lucky for you, MyFonts has over 130,000 fonts to choose from! Scroll through our curated section below to get ideas of how you can use these fonts to brand your own business or project.



INTERFACE: With interface products, even if your design is beautiful, interactive or include clear navigation there needs to be engaging textual content. Otherwise, users will quickly delete the app, the product will not be as successful, and users will not stay on your site.

For the best user experience with interface, you want to use fonts that are clearly legible on a screen environment and provide readers with copy that can easily be read in whatever content it’s being shown.

Check out our curated list of interface-friendly fonts and see how our foundry partners have put them to use.



PRINT: Many graphic communicators think typography is about fonts. Fonts are clearly important – but there is much more. Good typography invites readership through properly placed headlines and subheads; facilitates content flow with appropriate typeface choice, even typographic color and easy to read columns. It makes a message memorable through clear hierarchy and scanability; and builds brand with consistent typeface choice and arrangement.

The most common typographic errors are those of fashion. Typeface choice, size and arrangement based on what is chic is very often not only out of style, but also inappropriate for the message, situation or reader. In most textual communication, classic typefaces and typographic orchestration are the best choice. It’s why they’re classic.

See our list of amazing print-friendly fonts below.



PUBLICATION: Books, magazines, newsletters, blog posts, product manuals and such – whether they be hardcopy or digital have two basic requirements. The font needs to be inviting and easy to read. Choose the best typefaces to usher readers into the accompanying text copy without distracting from it. These typefaces can either complement or contrast with the text copy. A dramatic change in typeface will create the most emphasis, while the simplest – and most reliable – complementary choice is to use a bold weight of the typeface used in the text copy.

Choose the best typefaces to usher readers into the accompanying text copy without distracting from it. These typefaces can either complement or contrast with the text copy. A dramatic change in typeface will create the most emphasis, while the simplest – and most reliable – complementary choice is to use a bold weight of the typeface used in the text copy.

Scroll through the curated selection below and see how our foundry partners have used their fonts for publication!



STATIONERY: Items like stationery notes, business cards, invitations, greeting cards, and business cards have been around for years. Before there was social media, there was social printing! These items were, in a sense, personal branding for the designers.

Many of the modern-day stationery items have evolved into digital versions while the old hardcopy versions are almost extinct. Still, stationery plays a huge role in everyday life from birthdays, to events, to business cards.

Whether it's hardcopy or digital version, the two most important parts of social communication are the brand and the informational copy. The brand can be the person, event, company or product’s name. The informational copy is what you want to tell the reader about the brand. The brand can be set in scripts, fanciful display faces or fonts that evoke a time or place. The informational copy should be set in typefaces that are legible and easy to read.

Check out our curated list of stationary fonts below that are great for all of your stationary needs.



PACKAGING: The best packaging stands out and fits in. Whether you’re designing packaging for a boutique line of soap, floor polish or landscape staples, you’ll want to pick typefaces that get noticed. Packaging is, after all, a form of advertising and branding. You’ll want distinctive and, in some cases, even flamboyant fonts for the product name, while required product labeling information should be set in a clean, unassuming, space efficient and legible design.

“Less is more” is also a good guideline to follow. It may be tempting to include a lot of fonts in packaging design, but this “circus poster” form of typography will almost assuredly create a cluttered and confusing design – especially on the relatively small canvases that packaging provides. Don’t blend in. Stand out!

Scroll through the curated selection below and see how our foundry partners have used their fonts for packaging!



CHILDREN: When selecting a typeface for products aimed at children, look for a warm, friendly design with simple, generous letter shapes. Counters should be rounded and open, not angular or rectangular and stay away from typefaces with non-traditional letterforms. Typefaces with larger x-heights are also generally easier to read – this is especially true for children.

Fonts for headlines and product branding can be playful in design and color. Decorated typestyles, lots of color, and curved and jumping baselines can all be used to attract and entertain young audiences. Look to fun-loving and light-hearted typestyles, and ones that can take advantage of multiple colors.

Scroll through the curated selection below and see how our foundry partners have used their fonts for children!



FASHION: You can’t talk about fashion and fonts without first talking about Didone fonts. While fashion is all about trends and what’s new, Didone fonts have stood the test of time as an immovable centerpiece of fashion magazine covers, ads, and brand logotypes. They are still well-used!

However, over the last few years, fashion magazines have been moving away from traditional scripts and Didones, and are using more exciting, inventive typefaces. The simplicity of a sans serif design along with an elegant serif typeface can create a modern – yet timeless look. But fashion typography is not limited to publication design and magazine advertising. It can be as simple as a hang tag or as complicated as a seasonal catalog. It can also be as small as a garment label or as large as graphic hoodie. Choose fonts for these applications as you would for their non-fashion counterparts.

Scroll through the curated selection below and see how our foundry partners have used their fonts for fashion and apparel!



We hoped you enjoyed our Fonts in Action sale! See you again next year!

Mont, Uni Neue are a trademark of Fontfabric. Takeaway is a trademark of Fenotype. Marujo is a trademark of PintassilgoPrints. Neue Haas Grotesk is a trademark of Monotype Imaging Inc. and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. Commuters Sans is a trademark of Dharma Type. Seaside is a trademark of AndrijType. Attribute is a trademark of Monotype GmbH and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. FF is a trademark of Monotype GmbH registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be registered in certain other jurisdictions. Halogen is a trademark of Positype. Gold is a trademark of FontMesa. Cera Pro is a trademark of TypeMates. Tellumo, Cotford, Sackers Gothic, Slate, Amrys are a trademark of Monotype Imaging Inc. and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. Brevia is a trademark of HVD Fonts. Clonoid is a trademark of Dharma Type. ITC Novarese is a trademark of Monotype ITC Inc. and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. Bookeyed Nelson is a trademark of Font Diner DBA Tart Workshop. Linotype Silver is a trademark of Monotype GmbH and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. Trade Gothic Next is a trademark of Monotype GmbH registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be registered in certain other jurisdictions. ITC Avant Garde Gothic is a trademark of Monotype ITC Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and which may be registered in certain other jurisdictions. Helvetica Now is a trademark of Monotype Imaging Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be registered in certain other jurisdictions.

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