FF BeoSans

Designed by Just Van Rossum and Erik Van Blokland in 1991. Published by FontFont as part of the FF BeoSans / FF Beowolf Super Family.

Starts at $39 for a single style and is available for:
Type to compare other characters
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Hard R20 Regular
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Hard R20 Bold
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Hard R21 Regular
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Hard R21 Bold
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Hard R22 Regular
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Hard R22 Bold
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Hard R23 Regular
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Hard R23 Bold
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Hard R24 Regular
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Hard R24 Bold
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Soft R10 Regular
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Soft R10 Bold
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Soft R11 Regular
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Soft R11 Bold
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Soft R12 Regular
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Soft R12 Bold
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Soft R13 Regular
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Soft R13 Bold
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Soft R14 Regular
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Soft R14 Bold
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120
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
70
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
40
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
25
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
18
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
12
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
120
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
70
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
40
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
25
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
18
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.
12
Zyklisches Jodeln ist in Bayern versuchsweise erlaubt. Österreich und Südtirol zeigen auch Interesse an der Therapie.

FF BeoSans supports up to 50 different languages such as Spanish, English, Portuguese, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Irish, Basque, Luxembourgian, and Icelandic in Latin and other scripts.

Please note that not all languages are available for all formats.

View all 50 languages

Errësohem
Jäädyttäminen tihkusadetta
Tempête
Chaparrón
Heiß
Tåget

Languages

Please select a product:

Supports 50 different languages:

  • A
  • Afar
  • Afrikaans
  • Albanian
  • Asturian
  • B
  • Basque
  • Breton
  • C
  • Catalan
  • Cornish
  • Corsican
  • D
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • E
  • English
  • F
  • Faroese
  • Fijian
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Frisian
  • Friulian
  • G
  • Gaelic (Scottish)
  • Galician
  • German
  • I
  • Icelandic
  • Indonesian
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • K
  • Kinyarwanda (Ruanda)
  • Kirundi (Rundi)
  • L
  • Ladin
  • Luxembourgian
  • M
  • Malay (Latin)
  • N
  • Norwegian
  • O
  • Occitan
  • Oromo (Afan, Galla)
  • P
  • Papiamentu
  • Portuguese
  • Q
  • Quechua
  • R
  • Rhaeto-Romance
  • S
  • Sardinian
  • Shona
  • Somali
  • Spanish
  • Swahili (Kiswahili)
  • Swedish
  • T
  • Tagalog
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • U
  • Uighur
  • W
  • Walloon
  • X
  • Xhosa
  • Z
  • Zulu
The
Black
Phlegmatics
Superscript
| 167
| 167
Fractions
| 135/167
| 135/167
Subscript
| 167
| 167
Replaces character with subscript version.
Ordinals
| 1a2o
| 1a2o
Replaces characters with ordinal forms for use after figures.
Standard Ligatures
| flfi
| flfi
Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a ligature. Active by default.
Case-Sensitive Forms
| (H-o)
| (H-o)
Shifts punctuation up to a position that works better with all-caps text.
View this style in detail
Technological discoveries are the spermatozoa of social change.
— C. L. R. James
View this style in detail
Punctuation
!
"
#
%
&
'
(
)
*
,
-
.
/
:
;
?
@
[
\
]
^
_
`
{
}
¡
§
¨
¯
´
·
¸
¿
Uppercase
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Lowercase
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
Modifiers
ʻ
ʼ
ˆ
ˇ
˘
˙
˚
˛
˜
˝
Ligatures
Currency
$
¢
£
¤
¥
Symbols
+
<
=
>
|
~
¬
±
×
÷
Decimal
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Other
²
³
¹
¼
½
¾
Mathematical Operators
Superscripts and Subscripts
Miscellaneous
¦
©
®
°
Letterlike
Geometric Shapes
Lowercase
µ
ß
à
á
â
ã
ä
å
æ
ç
è
é
ê
ë
ì
í
î
ï
ð
ñ
ò
ó
ô
õ
ö
ø
ù
ú
û
ü
ý
þ
ÿ
ı
ł
œ
š
ž
ƒ
Uppercase
À
Á
Â
Ã
Ä
Å
Æ
Ç
È
É
Ê
Ë
Ì
Í
Î
Ï
Ð
Ñ
Ò
Ó
Ô
Õ
Ö
Ø
Ù
Ú
Û
Ü
Ý
Þ
Ł
Œ
Š
Ÿ
Ž
Uppercase
Δ
Ω
Lowercase
μ
π

FF Beowolf came about at the end of the dark and murky 1980s when Just van Rossum and Erik van Blokland found a way to hack PostScript fonts. When printed, each point in each letter on the page would move randomly, giving the letters a shaken, distraught appearance. First called simply “RandomFont,” the invention caught FontFont’s attention and they offered to sell and distribute the beast. Van Blokland and van Rossum created three versions with increasing degrees of potential randomness. Given the name FF Beowolf, the face caused typographers and graphic designers in good standing to cry out, seeing it as final proof of the dangerous effects of computers on typography. This luckily turned out to be a generational thing, and soon FF Beowolf was being used for posters, headlines, CD covers, band logos, magazine callouts, and everything else. Technically outside the spec, the code in FF Beowolf wasn’t what computer and printer manufacturers were expecting for desktop publishing. So, while it worked fine (if a tad slow) through most of the 1990s, FF Beowolf was eventually barred from performing its PostScript magic: pesky things like printer drivers and operating systems learned to ignore the aberrations. FF Beowolf seemed destined to end up a mere memory. OpenType technology brought new hope, cutting new pathways in the type-tech continuum, which would eventually lead to a new generation of random fonts. Purists and typographic philosophers will be quick to point out that these OT fonts do not actually alter their shape in the printer as their forebearers did. Instead they make use of a kind of pre-programmed randomness: each glyph in each font (except R20) has ten alternate forms and a massive Faustian brain to control the mayhem. Specially developed and hellishly complex, nearly ninety thousand glyphs and an army of purpose-built ’bots took days to forge the OpenType features no ordinary type tool could have assembled. The FF Beowolf OpenType fonts come in four strengths. The randomness performs on screen as you type in any application on MacOS and Windows which supports OpenType. FF BeoSans is based on a sturdy sans face by Just van Rossum. FF BeoSans Hard follows the harsh angles of FF Beowolf, while FF BeoSans Soft is the smoother companion. Each has a bold version and R11-14 and R21-24 have 10 randomly generated alternatives for every character. In 2011, the Museum of Modern Art in New York added a first – a selection of digital typefaces to its permanent collection. FF Beowolf was one of just 23 designs to be included as part of the “Standard Deviations” installation.

FF BeoSans has 20 Styles