OCR A

Designed by Adrian Frutiger in 1968. Published by Linotype.

Starts at $39 for a single style and is available for:
Regular
120
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.
70
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.
40
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.
25
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.
18
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.
12
J’ai vu un punk afghan et deux clowns aux Monsieur Jack. Où l'obèse jury mûr? Mon pauvre zébu ankylosé choque deux fois ton wagon jaune.

OCR A supports up to 15 different languages such as English and Basque in Latin and other scripts.

Please note that not all languages are available for all formats.

View all 15 languages

Languages

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Fractions
135/167 135/167
Replaces figures separated by a slash with 'common' (diagonal) fractions.
Mechanization best serves mediocrity.
— Frank Lloyd Wright
Punctuation
Uppercase
Lowercase
Modifiers
Ligatures
Currency
Symbols
Decimal
Other
Mathematical Operators
Miscellaneous
Letterlike
Geometric Shapes
Lowercase
Uppercase
Uppercase
Lowercase
Symbols

OCR A and OCR B are standardized, monospaced fonts designed for "Optical Character Recognition" on electronic devices. OCR A was developed to meet the standards set by the American National Standards Institute in 1966 for the processing of documents by banks, credit card companies and similar businesses. This font was intended to be "read" by scanning devices, and not necessarily by humans. However, because of its "techno" look, it has been re-discovered for advertising and display graphics. OCR B was designed in 1968 by Adrian Frutiger to meet the standards of the European Computer Manufacturer's Association. It was intended for use on products that were to be scanned by electronic devices as well as read by humans. OCR B was made a world standard in 1973, and is more legible to human eyes than most other OCR fonts. Though less appealingly geeky than OCR A, the OCR B version also has a distinctive technical appearance that makes it a hit with graphic designers.

OCR A has 1 Style