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How to find a suitable text font?

On quotation marks and other puzzling punctuation

November 01, 2017 by
Peter Glaab
Peter Glaab

“Whoever does not respect the penny is not worthy of the dollar”. This proverb also applies to the conscious use of punctuation marks in text setting. Typography with impressive features that appear striking at first glance is compelling – font selection and a blend of fonts, appropriate line length, appropriate line spacing and typographic emphasis. The minutest details are just as important: comma, semicolon, period, colon, question mark, exclamation mark, brackets, hyphen and dash.

How to find a suitable text font?

August 04, 2017 by
Peter Glaab
Peter Glaab

Searching for the right font for a text-intensive design project can feel like trying to solve a riddle. This is because the requirements for a suitable font are actually much more complex than it seems at first glance – and the almost endless number of available fonts doesn’t make the decision any easier, either. But don’t worry: with the right questions and a few criteria, your search will be a success. The focus of this article is fonts for typesetting.

Five ways to improve your typography now

August 17, 2016 by
David Sudweeks
David Sudweeks

Sure there are lots of things you can do to improve yourself as a typographer, like reading books and becoming a generally more observant person. And there’s no getting around that. You’ll eventually have to do it and it’ll take time. “But what can I learn right now?,” you ask.

What is OpenType?

July 18, 2016 by
David Sudweeks
David Sudweeks

OpenType fonts have some big advantages to older TrueType fonts, or legacy PostScript Type 1 fonts. That’s because OpenType is an updated version of the TrueType font format spec, with improvements you notice, like OpenType features, and those you likely don’t, like the type designer’s ability to use PostScript outlines instead of TrueType outlines in the fonts.

Curly Quotes

June 28, 2016 by
David Sudweeks
David Sudweeks

The standard QWERTY keyboard, like its predecessor the typewriter, has a single key for opening and closing both single and double quotes (and for the apostrophe which is the same as a closed single quotation mark). From this we get ‘straight quotes,’ or ‘dumb quotes’ which at arm’s length and squinting, might pass for proper apostrophes and typographic quotation marks, or as I call them here, curly quotes.